Mutualisms Symposium

As part of the group exhibition “Mutualisms” Erik Hagoort and Caroline Picard have organized a symposium to take place on Sunday 11th of September from 1-5 pm. That Sunday the artists participating in “Mutualisms” together with guests from Chicago (Kevin Kaempf, Jason Pallas, Anni Holm, Abigail Satinsky and Karsten Lund) and Holland  (Philippine Hoegen, Marjolijn Dijkman, and Rune Peitersen) will gather at the CoProsperity Sphere to address the theme of Art & Reciprocity. 

About Art & Reciprocity:
In general reciprocity is valued positively, especially in contemporary art where it is so often recognized as an essential part of community and resource-sharing. Reciprocity has become a buzzword, especially since the rise of interactive art practices, in which the public in one way or another is invited to participate. The appreciation of reciprocity has challenged the conventional distance and hierarchy between art, artists and the public. It has also triggered collaboration among artists.
Yet, if reciprocity becomes normative, we may start to feel uneasy. Expectations for ‘something in return’ can restrict freedom and autonomy. Mutual expectations may infect unconditional giving and hospitality with the urge of exchange. In the arts a strong tradition has opposed reciprocity. Art’s autonomy should prevail above exchange. So, the question is: what about art and reciprocity?
The aim of the symposium is not so much to answer but to confront this question from different perspectives. In short rounds guests and artists will come forward with their ideas on this matter, by personal stories, experiences, reflections, statements, examples of works.
About the panelists:

Anni Holm

Anni Holm, is the Co-Founder, Director and Curator of People Made Visible, Inc. (PMV). PMV is a non-for-profit organization based in the city of West Chicago with a mission to facilitate community while fulfilling the artistic, social, educational and cultural needs of the community through an innovative physical and web based presence. Besides claiming to be a conceptual artist, she works as the Art Coordinator at Waubonsee Community College in Sugar Grove, IL, and has been a teaching artist with CAPE (Chicago Arts Partnership in Education) since 2009.

http://anniholm.com

Abigail Satinsky

Abigail Satinsky is the director of programming at Threewalls where she amongst other things initiated Community-Supported Art Chicago, a yearly art subscription service of locally produced art and developed PHONEBOOK 3, a directory of independent art spaces, programming, and projects throughout the United States. She is furthermore a member of InCUBATE, a research group dedicated to exploring new approaches to arts administration and arts funding. Their activities have manifested in a series traveling exhibitions called Other Options, an artist residency program, and various other projects such as Sunday Soup.

 http://www.three-walls.org/

http://incubate-chicago.org/

Karsten Lund

Since moving to Chicago, Karsten Lund has worked as a curator and a writer, and pursued a variety of other creative pursuits. He is currently a curatorial assistant at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago and from 2007 to 2009 he worked as a research fellow at the Museum of Contemporary Photography (MoCP). Karsten is currently organizing an experimental exhibition, with four artists, which will be staged at a former factory in West Humboldt Park next month and again at the Hyde Park Art Center in fall 2012.

http://www.mcachicago.org/

http://www.hydeparkart.org/exhibitions/2012/09/two_histories_of_the_world.php

Jason Pallas

Jason Thomas Pallas (USA) has worked on collaborative, community-based projects for the past 8 years. As an example, he founded an after-school and summer arts organization for at-risk Latino youth called “Art Y Más”. In his artistic practice, J. Thomas has teamed up with the late activist Beauty Turner for a series of Ghetto Bus Tours, where participants visit Chicago Housing Authority sites to interact with the residents for mutual understanding. In general, Pallas’ work occupies the intersection of the popular, the personal, and the political.

http://jthomaspallas.com

Kevin Kaempf

“People Powered”, formed by Kevin Kaempf (USA) and Lora Lode(USA), designs experimental pilot programs that integrate art, environmentalism, and communities. Examples are the re-use of bikes (“Shared: Chicago Blue Bikes”) and the recycling of excess latex paint (“Loop Limited”). By presenting these projects in exhibitions and public locations in the city, People Powered creates a platform for discussing how these practices may intersect.

http://www.peoplepowered.org

Rune Peitersen

Rune Peitersen (NL) is a visual artist, focusing on the retinal, but this doesn’t exclude taking position in society as an artist, when needed. Together with other artists Peitersen initiated Platform Re-set, an action group using the knowledge and tools that artists have, to react to alarming recent developments in the political climate in the Netherlands: “At the moment artists and the arts are being talked about, not addressed directly. We want to reaffirm our position in society. ”

http://www.platformre-set.nl/manifesto-en

Philippine Hoegen

Research, display, context, collaboration (often with Carolien Stikker) are some of the keynote concepts in the work and activities of Philippine Hoegen (NL). With other artists in 2010 Philippine Hoegen started Calcite Revolt: an initiative created to provide and research new models of interaction and collaboration between artists, curators and theorists. Critically regarding common structures and hierarchies, its aim is to develop productive, fluid and adventurous ways of contributing to each others development and practice.

http://www.philippinehoegen.com

http://www.calciterevolt.com/bulletin

Marjolijn Dijkman

Through her diverse work Marjolijn Dijkman (NL) often considers the foundations of how we perceive and experience our surroundings. Perception is for Dijkman always embedded, contextual, therefore her practice has concerned itself with for example futurology, public space, knowledge organisation, cartography, utopian architecture or environmentalism.

In 2005 together with Maarten Vanden Eynde she founded Enough Room for Space (ERforS). ERforS is an artist-run organization to create a platform where investigations by individual participants in projects can overlap and lead to new collaborations.

http://www.marjolijndijkman.com

http://www.enoughroomforspace.org


Bad at Sports: How to get to Mutualisms

http://badatsports.com/2011/how-to-get-to-mutualisms/


Mutualisms Chicago Exhibition Info

Mutualisms
September 9-25
At Co-Prosperity Sphere , 3219 -21 South Morgan Street, Chicago
Opening September 9, 6-10 pm
Symposium: September 11, 1-5 pm
Opening times: Wed-Sun 1-5 pm

‘Mutualisms’ is a collaborative curatorial project organized by Lise Haller Baggesen and Kirsten Leenaars, exploring the ways in which networks of friendship and artistic collaboration can be used as a model for curating. ‘Mutualisms’ is looking into artistic strategies for finding hospitality and exchange in the context of contemporary art practices as well our own social domain.

Eight Dutch and eight American artists/artist duos were paired and worked together to create a collaborative presentation of their works. Iris Kensmil & Carol Jackson, Rune Peitersen & Mark Jeffery & Judd Morrissey, Marjolijn Dijkman & Lora Lode/Kevin Kaempf, Jonas Ohlsson & Selina Trepp, Magnus Monfeldt & Harold Mendez, Maurice Bogaert & Trevor Gainer, Caroline Stikker/Philippine Hoegen & Aron Gent and Saskia Janssen/George Korsmit & Adelheid Mers.

Mutualisms Symposium

Sunday September 1-5 pm at Co-Prosperity Sphere

A conversation with the participating Mutualisms artists will be followed by a panel discussion on ‘art and reciprocity’ moderated by Dutch art critic Erik Hagoort and Chicago based writer Caroline Picard.

Art & Reciprocity

In general reciprocity is valued positively, and so in contemporary art. Reciprocity has become a buzzword, especially since the rise of interactive art practices, in which the public in one way or another is invited to participate. The appreciation of reciprocity has challenged the conventional distance and hierarchy between art, artists and the public. It has also triggered collaboration among artists. Yet, if reciprocity becomes normative, we may start to feel uneasy. Expectations for ‘something in return’ can restrict freedom and autonomy. In the arts a strong tradition has opposed reciprocity; art’s autonomy should prevail above exchange. So, the question is: what about art and reciprocity? Panel to be announced on our blogs at a later date.

Art & Reciprocity blog: http://artandreciprocity.wordpress.com/

For info and opening times: lise@baggesen.org and kirstenleenaars@hotmail.com

‘Mutualisms’ is supported, in part, by public funds from the Netherlands Cultural Services, the Mondriaan Foundation and the Propeller Fund.


In response to: You’ll Never Walk Alone

Magnus, The last line of your post here is entirely on point. It’s great. It’s interesting how you keep referring back to your father as a source of inspiration or point of departure to discuss your current ideas in your practice.  I know it’s a big jump in content or narrative here but the images you posted made me think of my trip to Egypt last October.  I’m not sure why.  Maybe it’s because when I see ink work I think of inscriptions and of personal stories.  In any case, I’ve been thinking about the film The Night of Counting the Years, a.k.a. Al-Mummia by Shadi Abdel Salam, with regards to this exchange we are having.  I’m considering how you allude to identity in your work here but also in our email exchanges. I think the film discuss a personal consciousness and identity that is inherently tied to history.  Hopefully you see the connections between your post and mine.

“The film casts its story in terms of the search for an authentic, lost Egyptian national identity, represented by the neglected and misunderstood artifacts ofancient Egyptian civilisation. However, the conflict between city and countryside suggests questions that are not resolved in the film, making it an ambiguous, unsettling reflection on the price of identity.”

It seems as if we are both examining the deterioration of the body and or of landscapes with regards to either physical or psychological constraint.  Your recent posts have also reminded me of Bill Morrison’s film Decasia: The State of Decay. (See two following images below).  On the one hand I seem to be exploring our Mutualism collaboration by working with content and imagery through space/place while you seem to be including the figure.  So here I present the body as atmosphere in contrast to your presentation of the corporeal.

You’ll never walk alone:

https://mutualisms.wordpress.com/2011/08/10/youll-never-walk-alone-2/


As Seen in Magazine

 

Our ad in Metropolis M


Thank You Dutch Consulate in NY

 

 

This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the Netherlands Cultural Services”.

 


My problem with community art

After Kevin and Kirsten came to visit us in Detroit and we talked about art I wrote this piece
that will be published in Proximity magazine and was published in LA too…

It is called
“My (The) Problem with community art…and why Williiam Burroughs eat Superflex any day of the week”

enjoy!!!!

http://newstrategiesdmc.blogspot.com/2011/07/my-problem-with-community-artand-why.html